Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

Anne Bahde, rare books and history of science librarian at OSU's Valley Library, is one of the winners of an award from the Center for Research Libraries. The 2016 Primary Source Award in Research recognizes the book “Using Primary Sources, Hands-On Instructional Exercises,” published in 2015. Anne Bahde is one of three co-editors. This monograph, aimed at special collections librarians, archivists, faculty, and museum professionals, surveyed innovative methods to promote the successful use of primary sources in student research. 

After noticing a dearth of tools to assist in effectively teaching the use of special collections, the three academic librarians solicited a broad range of examples from their peers. They selected 30 exercises for this study, representing a variety of materials formats (including postcards, maps, legal documents, and digital files), designated audiences (K–12 to college students), and instructors’ roles (librarians, professors, museum professionals). The book is divided into two sections: the first part provides examples of “classic” primary source materials (asking students to identify the type of primary source, its provenance, and intended audience); and the second part explores innovative exercises “that delve deeper into the sources.”

Anne Bahde, rare books and history of science librarian at OSU's Valley Library, is one of the winners of an award from the Center for Research Libraries. The 2016 Primary Source Award in Research recognizes the book “Using Primary Sources, Hands-On Instructional Exercises,” published in 2015. Anne Bahde is one of three co-editors. This monograph, aimed at special collections librarians, archivists, faculty, and museum professionals, surveyed innovative methods to promote the successful use of primary sources in student research. 

After noticing a dearth of tools to assist in effectively teaching the use of special collections, the three academic librarians solicited a broad range of examples from their peers. They selected 30 exercises for this study, representing a variety of materials formats (including postcards, maps, legal documents, and digital files), designated audiences (K–12 to college students), and instructors’ roles (librarians, professors, museum professionals). The book is divided into two sections: the first part provides examples of “classic” primary source materials (asking students to identify the type of primary source, its provenance, and intended audience); and the second part explores innovative exercises “that delve deeper into the sources.”

Anne Bahde, rare books and history of science librarian at OSU's Valley Library, is one of the winners of an award from the Center for Research Libraries. The 2016 Primary Source Award in Research recognizes the book “Using Primary Sources, Hands-On Instructional Exercises,” published in 2015. Anne Bahde is one of three co-editors. This monograph, aimed at special collections librarians, archivists, faculty, and museum professionals, surveyed innovative methods to promote the successful use of primary sources in student research. 

After noticing a dearth of tools to assist in effectively teaching the use of special collections, the three academic librarians solicited a broad range of examples from their peers. They selected 30 exercises for this study, representing a variety of materials formats (including postcards, maps, legal documents, and digital files), designated audiences (K–12 to college students), and instructors’ roles (librarians, professors, museum professionals). The book is divided into two sections: the first part provides examples of “classic” primary source materials (asking students to identify the type of primary source, its provenance, and intended audience); and the second part explores innovative exercises “that delve deeper into the sources.”

The library’s spring workshops wind down with a repeat of Zotero (Intro and Intermediate/Advanced) on May 2; Zotero is an excellent online tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. 

Registration is encouraged but not required: http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Stay tuned for the summer workshop schedule. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

The library’s spring workshops wind down with a repeat of Zotero (Intro and Intermediate/Advanced) on May 2; Zotero is an excellent online tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. 

Registration is encouraged but not required: http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Stay tuned for the summer workshop schedule. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

The library’s spring workshops wind down with a repeat of Zotero (Intro and Intermediate/Advanced) on May 2; Zotero is an excellent online tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. 

Registration is encouraged but not required: http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Stay tuned for the summer workshop schedule. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Satisfy your curiosity about 3-D Printing and Scanning on April 27. Check out Scalar, a platform for digital publishing, on April 28. 

View all the offerings in the library’s spring workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

 

Satisfy your curiosity about 3-D Printing and Scanning on April 27. Check out Scalar, a platform for digital publishing, on April 28. 

View all the offerings in the library’s spring workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

 

Satisfy your curiosity about 3-D Printing and Scanning on April 27. Check out Scalar, a platform for digital publishing, on April 28. 

View all the offerings in the library’s spring workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

 

Dr. Jane Lubchenco, the 2016 winner of the Linus Pauling Legacy Award sponsored by Oregon State University Libraries and Press, will deliver a free public lecture in Portland on Tuesday, April 26 at 7:30 p.m. at the Oregon Historical Society, 1200 SW Park Avenue. Her talk is titled “Scientists Making Waves and Bringing Hope.” 

The Linus Pauling Award recognizes outstanding achievement in a subject of interest to the famous scientist and two-time Nobel laureate, and several of the previous recipients were Nobel Prize winners. Lubchenco is the ninth winner of the prestigious award. Lubchenco holds the title of university distinguished professor and advisor in Marine Studies at Oregon State University and was formerly the administrator of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and under secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere. 

In addition to her work at Oregon State, Lubchenco is currently serving as the first U.S. Science Envoy for the Ocean and is an international expert on marine ecology, environmental science and climate change. With a Ph.D. in ecology from Harvard University, Lubchenco is one of the most highly cited ecologists in the world, and she has received numerous awards including a MacArthur “genius” award and 20 honorary doctorates.

Lubchenco’s lecture in Portland is wheelchair accessible. Individuals requiring other accommodations should contact Don Frier at 541-737-4633 or don.frier@oregonstate.edu by April 20 so that appropriate arrangements can be made.

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