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Korey JacksonDr. Korey Jackson has been named the new Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services at Oregon State University Libraries and Press. In this role, Dr. Jackson will establish a forward-thinking, strategic, and robust digital publishing architecture for OSU Libraries and Press. He will lead experimentation with innovative means for transforming the way scholarship is created, collected, organized, and disseminated.

 “It is an exciting time for an organization like ours that combines the skills and expertise of  both librarians and university press professionals, “ explained Faye A. Chadwell, Donald and Delpha Campbell University Librarian and OSU Press Director. “We have established a reputation for experimenting to enhance existing services or create new ones. In the coming years we intend to focus on innovative ways to enable the creation and dissemination of knowledge and enhance digital scholarship.  Dr. Jackson brings the right blend of experience, vision, and talent to lead a deeper investigation of digital publishing opportunities for the Libraries and Press.”

Before coming to OSU, Dr. Jackson was an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Public Fellow at Anvil Academic, a digital humanities publisher sponsored by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE). While at Anvil he served as Program Coordinator, helping to create editorial partnerships, engage in social media relations, and implement digital publishing strategies for a number of humanities projects.

 Prior to this he held a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan’s Michigan Publishing, where he developed campus-wide outreach efforts around open access publishing and digital humanities training and discussion.

 Dr. Jackson earned his PhD in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan. He was a Lecturer in the English department at Michigan from 2010-2011.

He blogged extensively for both Anvil Academic and Michigan Publishing, and his co-authored chapter on humanities data publishing in the ALA/ACRL publication Getting the Word Out: Academic Libraries as Scholarly Publishers is forthcoming in 2014.

 Established with a $2 million endowment, The Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services is designed, in part, to identify innovative means for accessing and improving the delivery of information to the students, faculty, and staff — with the goal of moving OSU Libraries and Press to the forefront as an information provider. Dr. Jackson is the third holder of this prestigious position and follows in the very successful footsteps of Jeremy Frumkin and Terry Reese.

Korey JacksonDr. Korey Jackson has been named the new Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services at Oregon State University Libraries and Press. In this role, Dr. Jackson will establish a forward-thinking, strategic, and robust digital publishing architecture for OSU Libraries and Press. He will lead experimentation with innovative means for transforming the way scholarship is created, collected, organized, and disseminated.

 “It is an exciting time for an organization like ours that combines the skills and expertise of  both librarians and university press professionals, “ explained Faye A. Chadwell, Donald and Delpha Campbell University Librarian and OSU Press Director. “We have established a reputation for experimenting to enhance existing services or create new ones. In the coming years we intend to focus on innovative ways to enable the creation and dissemination of knowledge and enhance digital scholarship.  Dr. Jackson brings the right blend of experience, vision, and talent to lead a deeper investigation of digital publishing opportunities for the Libraries and Press.”

Before coming to OSU, Dr. Jackson was an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Public Fellow at Anvil Academic, a digital humanities publisher sponsored by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE). While at Anvil he served as Program Coordinator, helping to create editorial partnerships, engage in social media relations, and implement digital publishing strategies for a number of humanities projects.

 Prior to this he held a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan’s Michigan Publishing, where he developed campus-wide outreach efforts around open access publishing and digital humanities training and discussion.

 Dr. Jackson earned his PhD in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan. He was a Lecturer in the English department at Michigan from 2010-2011.

He blogged extensively for both Anvil Academic and Michigan Publishing, and his co-authored chapter on humanities data publishing in the ALA/ACRL publication Getting the Word Out: Academic Libraries as Scholarly Publishers is forthcoming in 2014.

 Established with a $2 million endowment, The Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services is designed, in part, to identify innovative means for accessing and improving the delivery of information to the students, faculty, and staff — with the goal of moving OSU Libraries and Press to the forefront as an information provider. Dr. Jackson is the third holder of this prestigious position and follows in the very successful footsteps of Jeremy Frumkin and Terry Reese.

Korey JacksonDr. Korey Jackson has been named the new Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services at Oregon State University Libraries and Press. In this role, Dr. Jackson will establish a forward-thinking, strategic, and robust digital publishing architecture for OSU Libraries and Press. He will lead experimentation with innovative means for transforming the way scholarship is created, collected, organized, and disseminated.

 “It is an exciting time for an organization like ours that combines the skills and expertise of  both librarians and university press professionals, “ explained Faye A. Chadwell, Donald and Delpha Campbell University Librarian and OSU Press Director. “We have established a reputation for experimenting to enhance existing services or create new ones. In the coming years we intend to focus on innovative ways to enable the creation and dissemination of knowledge and enhance digital scholarship.  Dr. Jackson brings the right blend of experience, vision, and talent to lead a deeper investigation of digital publishing opportunities for the Libraries and Press.”

Before coming to OSU, Dr. Jackson was an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Public Fellow at Anvil Academic, a digital humanities publisher sponsored by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE). While at Anvil he served as Program Coordinator, helping to create editorial partnerships, engage in social media relations, and implement digital publishing strategies for a number of humanities projects.

 Prior to this he held a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan’s Michigan Publishing, where he developed campus-wide outreach efforts around open access publishing and digital humanities training and discussion.

 Dr. Jackson earned his PhD in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan. He was a Lecturer in the English department at Michigan from 2010-2011.

He blogged extensively for both Anvil Academic and Michigan Publishing, and his co-authored chapter on humanities data publishing in the ALA/ACRL publication Getting the Word Out: Academic Libraries as Scholarly Publishers is forthcoming in 2014.

 Established with a $2 million endowment, The Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services is designed, in part, to identify innovative means for accessing and improving the delivery of information to the students, faculty, and staff — with the goal of moving OSU Libraries and Press to the forefront as an information provider. Dr. Jackson is the third holder of this prestigious position and follows in the very successful footsteps of Jeremy Frumkin and Terry Reese.

Korey JacksonDr. Korey Jackson has been named the new Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services at Oregon State University Libraries and Press. In this role, Dr. Jackson will establish a forward-thinking, strategic, and robust digital publishing architecture for OSU Libraries and Press. He will lead experimentation with innovative means for transforming the way scholarship is created, collected, organized, and disseminated.

 “It is an exciting time for an organization like ours that combines the skills and expertise of  both librarians and university press professionals, “ explained Faye A. Chadwell, Donald and Delpha Campbell University Librarian and OSU Press Director. “We have established a reputation for experimenting to enhance existing services or create new ones. In the coming years we intend to focus on innovative ways to enable the creation and dissemination of knowledge and enhance digital scholarship.  Dr. Jackson brings the right blend of experience, vision, and talent to lead a deeper investigation of digital publishing opportunities for the Libraries and Press.”

Before coming to OSU, Dr. Jackson was an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Public Fellow at Anvil Academic, a digital humanities publisher sponsored by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE). While at Anvil he served as Program Coordinator, helping to create editorial partnerships, engage in social media relations, and implement digital publishing strategies for a number of humanities projects.

 Prior to this he held a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan’s Michigan Publishing, where he developed campus-wide outreach efforts around open access publishing and digital humanities training and discussion.

 Dr. Jackson earned his PhD in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan. He was a Lecturer in the English department at Michigan from 2010-2011.

He blogged extensively for both Anvil Academic and Michigan Publishing, and his co-authored chapter on humanities data publishing in the ALA/ACRL publication Getting the Word Out: Academic Libraries as Scholarly Publishers is forthcoming in 2014.

 Established with a $2 million endowment, The Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services is designed, in part, to identify innovative means for accessing and improving the delivery of information to the students, faculty, and staff — with the goal of moving OSU Libraries and Press to the forefront as an information provider. Dr. Jackson is the third holder of this prestigious position and follows in the very successful footsteps of Jeremy Frumkin and Terry Reese.

Korey JacksonDr. Korey Jackson has been named the new Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services at Oregon State University Libraries and Press. In this role, Dr. Jackson will establish a forward-thinking, strategic, and robust digital publishing architecture for OSU Libraries and Press. He will lead experimentation with innovative means for transforming the way scholarship is created, collected, organized, and disseminated.

 “It is an exciting time for an organization like ours that combines the skills and expertise of  both librarians and university press professionals, “ explained Faye A. Chadwell, Donald and Delpha Campbell University Librarian and OSU Press Director. “We have established a reputation for experimenting to enhance existing services or create new ones. In the coming years we intend to focus on innovative ways to enable the creation and dissemination of knowledge and enhance digital scholarship.  Dr. Jackson brings the right blend of experience, vision, and talent to lead a deeper investigation of digital publishing opportunities for the Libraries and Press.”

Before coming to OSU, Dr. Jackson was an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Public Fellow at Anvil Academic, a digital humanities publisher sponsored by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE). While at Anvil he served as Program Coordinator, helping to create editorial partnerships, engage in social media relations, and implement digital publishing strategies for a number of humanities projects.

 Prior to this he held a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan’s Michigan Publishing, where he developed campus-wide outreach efforts around open access publishing and digital humanities training and discussion.

 Dr. Jackson earned his PhD in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan. He was a Lecturer in the English department at Michigan from 2010-2011.

He blogged extensively for both Anvil Academic and Michigan Publishing, and his co-authored chapter on humanities data publishing in the ALA/ACRL publication Getting the Word Out: Academic Libraries as Scholarly Publishers is forthcoming in 2014.

 Established with a $2 million endowment, The Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services is designed, in part, to identify innovative means for accessing and improving the delivery of information to the students, faculty, and staff — with the goal of moving OSU Libraries and Press to the forefront as an information provider. Dr. Jackson is the third holder of this prestigious position and follows in the very successful footsteps of Jeremy Frumkin and Terry Reese.

Korey JacksonDr. Korey Jackson has been named the new Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services at Oregon State University Libraries and Press. In this role, Dr. Jackson will establish a forward-thinking, strategic, and robust digital publishing architecture for OSU Libraries and Press. He will lead experimentation with innovative means for transforming the way scholarship is created, collected, organized, and disseminated.

 “It is an exciting time for an organization like ours that combines the skills and expertise of  both librarians and university press professionals, “ explained Faye A. Chadwell, Donald and Delpha Campbell University Librarian and OSU Press Director. “We have established a reputation for experimenting to enhance existing services or create new ones. In the coming years we intend to focus on innovative ways to enable the creation and dissemination of knowledge and enhance digital scholarship.  Dr. Jackson brings the right blend of experience, vision, and talent to lead a deeper investigation of digital publishing opportunities for the Libraries and Press.”

Before coming to OSU, Dr. Jackson was an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Public Fellow at Anvil Academic, a digital humanities publisher sponsored by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE). While at Anvil he served as Program Coordinator, helping to create editorial partnerships, engage in social media relations, and implement digital publishing strategies for a number of humanities projects.

 Prior to this he held a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan’s Michigan Publishing, where he developed campus-wide outreach efforts around open access publishing and digital humanities training and discussion.

 Dr. Jackson earned his PhD in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan. He was a Lecturer in the English department at Michigan from 2010-2011.

He blogged extensively for both Anvil Academic and Michigan Publishing, and his co-authored chapter on humanities data publishing in the ALA/ACRL publication Getting the Word Out: Academic Libraries as Scholarly Publishers is forthcoming in 2014.

 Established with a $2 million endowment, The Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services is designed, in part, to identify innovative means for accessing and improving the delivery of information to the students, faculty, and staff — with the goal of moving OSU Libraries and Press to the forefront as an information provider. Dr. Jackson is the third holder of this prestigious position and follows in the very successful footsteps of Jeremy Frumkin and Terry Reese.

Dr. Zia Mian, a physicist with Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, will receive the 2014 Linus Pauling Legacy Award, sponsored by the Oregon State University Libraries and Press. The award is given for his accomplishments as a scientist and as a peace activist in contributing to the global effort for nuclear disarmament and for a more peaceful world.

The Linus Pauling Legacy Award is granted every other year to an individual who has achieved in an area once of interest to Linus Pauling.  Dr. Mian’s career parallels Pauling’s in the dual nature of his work. The connections between the two men are particularly important as December 2013 marks the fiftieth anniversary of Linus Pauling’s receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize for his campaigning to end nuclear weapons testing. Pauling remains the only person to have received two unshared Nobel prizes.

Dr. Mian is the eighth person to receive the Pauling Legacy Award.  Past recipients have included Roald Hoffmann in 2012 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1981), Roger Kornberg in 2010 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003), Roderick MacKinnon in 2008 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003), Matthew Meselson in 2004 and in 2003 Sir Joseph Rotblat (Nobel Peace Prize 1995).

A native of Pakistan, Mian has a Ph. D. in physics, which he received from the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the United Kingdom. He has worked since the early 1990s in Pakistan and in the United States on nuclear weapons and nuclear energy policy, especially in South Asia, and on issues of global nuclear disarmament and peace. Dr. Mian currently directs the Project on Peace and Security in South Asia at Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, which is part of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, where he also teaches. 

A prolific author and engaging speaker who is known worldwide, Mian is co-editor of Science & Global Society, an international journal of technical analysis for arms control, disarmament and nonproliferation policy. He is also a founder-member of the International Panel on Fissile Materials, an independent group of arms-control experts from eighteen countries that works to develop policies to reduce and eliminate the global stockpiles of highly enriched uranium and plutonium, the key ingredients for nuclear weapons. Along with his scholarly work, he has written and helped to produce two documentary films on peace and security in South Asia – “Pakistan and India under the Nuclear Shadow,” (2001) and “Crossing the Lines: Kashmir, Pakistan, India” (2004). He also serves on the boards of several national and international non-profit organizations working for peace and justice.

As part of the celebration marking Dr. Mian’s acceptance of the award, he will be delivering a free public lecture at the Oregon History Society in Portland, Oregon on Monday, April 21, 2014, at 7:30 pm.  All are most welcome to join us for this special event. For more information, please contact the Special Collections & Archives Research Center at 541-737-2075 or scarc@oregonstate.edu.

Dr. Zia Mian, a physicist with Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, will receive the 2014 Linus Pauling Legacy Award, sponsored by the Oregon State University Libraries and Press. The award is given for his accomplishments as a scientist and as a peace activist in contributing to the global effort for nuclear disarmament and for a more peaceful world.

The Linus Pauling Legacy Award is granted every other year to an individual who has achieved in an area once of interest to Linus Pauling.  Dr. Mian’s career parallels Pauling’s in the dual nature of his work. The connections between the two men are particularly important as December 2013 marks the fiftieth anniversary of Linus Pauling’s receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize for his campaigning to end nuclear weapons testing. Pauling remains the only person to have received two unshared Nobel prizes.

Dr. Mian is the eighth person to receive the Pauling Legacy Award.  Past recipients have included Roald Hoffmann in 2012 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1981), Roger Kornberg in 2010 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003), Roderick MacKinnon in 2008 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003), Matthew Meselson in 2004 and in 2003 Sir Joseph Rotblat (Nobel Peace Prize 1995).

A native of Pakistan, Mian has a Ph. D. in physics, which he received from the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the United Kingdom. He has worked since the early 1990s in Pakistan and in the United States on nuclear weapons and nuclear energy policy, especially in South Asia, and on issues of global nuclear disarmament and peace. Dr. Mian currently directs the Project on Peace and Security in South Asia at Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, which is part of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, where he also teaches. 

A prolific author and engaging speaker who is known worldwide, Mian is co-editor of Science & Global Society, an international journal of technical analysis for arms control, disarmament and nonproliferation policy. He is also a founder-member of the International Panel on Fissile Materials, an independent group of arms-control experts from eighteen countries that works to develop policies to reduce and eliminate the global stockpiles of highly enriched uranium and plutonium, the key ingredients for nuclear weapons. Along with his scholarly work, he has written and helped to produce two documentary films on peace and security in South Asia – “Pakistan and India under the Nuclear Shadow,” (2001) and “Crossing the Lines: Kashmir, Pakistan, India” (2004). He also serves on the boards of several national and international non-profit organizations working for peace and justice.

As part of the celebration marking Dr. Mian’s acceptance of the award, he will be delivering a free public lecture at the Oregon History Society in Portland, Oregon on Monday, April 21, 2014, at 7:30 pm.  All are most welcome to join us for this special event. For more information, please contact the Special Collections & Archives Research Center at 541-737-2075 or scarc@oregonstate.edu.

Dr. Zia Mian, a physicist with Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, will receive the 2014 Linus Pauling Legacy Award, sponsored by the Oregon State University Libraries and Press. The award is given for his accomplishments as a scientist and as a peace activist in contributing to the global effort for nuclear disarmament and for a more peaceful world.

The Linus Pauling Legacy Award is granted every other year to an individual who has achieved in an area once of interest to Linus Pauling.  Dr. Mian’s career parallels Pauling’s in the dual nature of his work. The connections between the two men are particularly important as December 2013 marks the fiftieth anniversary of Linus Pauling’s receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize for his campaigning to end nuclear weapons testing. Pauling remains the only person to have received two unshared Nobel prizes.

Dr. Mian is the eighth person to receive the Pauling Legacy Award.  Past recipients have included Roald Hoffmann in 2012 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1981), Roger Kornberg in 2010 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003), Roderick MacKinnon in 2008 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003), Matthew Meselson in 2004 and in 2003 Sir Joseph Rotblat (Nobel Peace Prize 1995).

A native of Pakistan, Mian has a Ph. D. in physics, which he received from the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the United Kingdom. He has worked since the early 1990s in Pakistan and in the United States on nuclear weapons and nuclear energy policy, especially in South Asia, and on issues of global nuclear disarmament and peace. Dr. Mian currently directs the Project on Peace and Security in South Asia at Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, which is part of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, where he also teaches. 

A prolific author and engaging speaker who is known worldwide, Mian is co-editor of Science & Global Society, an international journal of technical analysis for arms control, disarmament and nonproliferation policy. He is also a founder-member of the International Panel on Fissile Materials, an independent group of arms-control experts from eighteen countries that works to develop policies to reduce and eliminate the global stockpiles of highly enriched uranium and plutonium, the key ingredients for nuclear weapons. Along with his scholarly work, he has written and helped to produce two documentary films on peace and security in South Asia – “Pakistan and India under the Nuclear Shadow,” (2001) and “Crossing the Lines: Kashmir, Pakistan, India” (2004). He also serves on the boards of several national and international non-profit organizations working for peace and justice.

As part of the celebration marking Dr. Mian’s acceptance of the award, he will be delivering a free public lecture at the Oregon History Society in Portland, Oregon on Monday, April 21, 2014, at 7:30 pm.  All are most welcome to join us for this special event. For more information, please contact the Special Collections & Archives Research Center at 541-737-2075 or scarc@oregonstate.edu.

Dr. Zia Mian, a physicist with Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, will receive the 2014 Linus Pauling Legacy Award, sponsored by the Oregon State University Libraries and Press. The award is given for his accomplishments as a scientist and as a peace activist in contributing to the global effort for nuclear disarmament and for a more peaceful world.

The Linus Pauling Legacy Award is granted every other year to an individual who has achieved in an area once of interest to Linus Pauling.  Dr. Mian’s career parallels Pauling’s in the dual nature of his work. The connections between the two men are particularly important as December 2013 marks the fiftieth anniversary of Linus Pauling’s receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize for his campaigning to end nuclear weapons testing. Pauling remains the only person to have received two unshared Nobel prizes.

Dr. Mian is the eighth person to receive the Pauling Legacy Award.  Past recipients have included Roald Hoffmann in 2012 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1981), Roger Kornberg in 2010 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003), Roderick MacKinnon in 2008 (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003), Matthew Meselson in 2004 and in 2003 Sir Joseph Rotblat (Nobel Peace Prize 1995).

A native of Pakistan, Mian has a Ph. D. in physics, which he received from the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the United Kingdom. He has worked since the early 1990s in Pakistan and in the United States on nuclear weapons and nuclear energy policy, especially in South Asia, and on issues of global nuclear disarmament and peace. Dr. Mian currently directs the Project on Peace and Security in South Asia at Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, which is part of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, where he also teaches. 

A prolific author and engaging speaker who is known worldwide, Mian is co-editor of Science & Global Society, an international journal of technical analysis for arms control, disarmament and nonproliferation policy. He is also a founder-member of the International Panel on Fissile Materials, an independent group of arms-control experts from eighteen countries that works to develop policies to reduce and eliminate the global stockpiles of highly enriched uranium and plutonium, the key ingredients for nuclear weapons. Along with his scholarly work, he has written and helped to produce two documentary films on peace and security in South Asia – “Pakistan and India under the Nuclear Shadow,” (2001) and “Crossing the Lines: Kashmir, Pakistan, India” (2004). He also serves on the boards of several national and international non-profit organizations working for peace and justice.

As part of the celebration marking Dr. Mian’s acceptance of the award, he will be delivering a free public lecture at the Oregon History Society in Portland, Oregon on Monday, April 21, 2014, at 7:30 pm.  All are most welcome to join us for this special event. For more information, please contact the Special Collections & Archives Research Center at 541-737-2075 or scarc@oregonstate.edu.

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