OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Ecampus News

Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

The University’s Corvallis campus is closing for the remainder of the day, effective at noon. Damage, smoke issues and other complications resulting from an electrical fire this morning in the university’s steam tunnels has caused widespread problems with electrical service, heating, smoke and network connectivity in a long and growing number of buildings.

In response to these issues, the Valley Library is closing at noon for the remainder of the day and will be closed for the Thanksgiving holiday on Thursday and Friday.

The University’s Corvallis campus is closing for the remainder of the day, effective at noon. Damage, smoke issues and other complications resulting from an electrical fire this morning in the university’s steam tunnels has caused widespread problems with electrical service, heating, smoke and network connectivity in a long and growing number of buildings.

In response to these issues, the Valley Library is closing at noon for the remainder of the day and will be closed for the Thanksgiving holiday on Thursday and Friday.

Oregon State University Libraries support arXiv. arXiv is an e-print service in the fields of physics, mathematics, non-linear science, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance and statistics, and provides open access to over 660,000 research articles in these subject areas. arXiv is owned and operated by Cornell University, a private not-for-profit educational institution. arXiv is funded by Cornell University Library and by supporting user institutions.

Oregon State University Libraries support arXiv. arXiv is an e-print service in the fields of physics, mathematics, non-linear science, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance and statistics, and provides open access to over 660,000 research articles in these subject areas. arXiv is owned and operated by Cornell University, a private not-for-profit educational institution. arXiv is funded by Cornell University Library and by supporting user institutions.

Oregon State University Libraries support arXiv. arXiv is an e-print service in the fields of physics, mathematics, non-linear science, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance and statistics, and provides open access to over 660,000 research articles in these subject areas. arXiv is owned and operated by Cornell University, a private not-for-profit educational institution. arXiv is funded by Cornell University Library and by supporting user institutions.

Just in case you’d like to know a little more about archiving your work, here are some resources.

If you want to know what your publisher’s usual policies about self-archiving are, you can go to the SHERPA/RoMEO Publisher Copyright Policies & Self-Archiving Web site and search by publisher or journal title. This website makes clear whether the publisher allows you to archive a pre-print, post-print, or publisher’s .pdf.

You might want to talk to Janet Webster (janet.webster@oregonstate.edu, 541-867-0108) about archiving your work. It doesn’t have to be that hard.

If the process of archiving your work seems a bit overwhelming, the OSU Libraries will be glad to help you. You might consider placing your work in our digital repository, Scholars Archive@OSU . And you don’t have to be directly affiliated with OSU to be able to contribute, ScholarsArchive@OSU is Oregon State University's digital service for gathering, indexing, making available and storing the scholarly work of the Oregon State University community. It also includes materials from outside the institution in support of the university's land, sun, sea and space grant missions and other research interests.

To have the library deposit your scholarly material for you:
Ask your research librarian or Sue Kunda (sue.kunda@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-7262) to have a collection created for your unit and/or for yourself. For an example of a collection, see University Libraries collection of Papers, Articles and Conference Proceedings.
Send your scholarly materials as email attachments or on a CD to Sue Kunda at the Valley Libraryor contact your research librarian to discuss options for submitting your research.
The library will find out whether the research can be legally deposited in ScholarsArchive@OSU, submit your research to ScholarsArchive@OSU, and notify you when it is available.

We all know the pleasant feeling of finding a link in an online catalog to a full-text copy of a report. Unfortunately, the speed of digitization projects sometimes outpace catalogers. This is particularly true for recently scanned ODFW publications. For some time, the OSU Libraries have been scanning ODFW publications and putting them in Scholars Archive, our digital repository. This note is about some easy ways to find this material.

How can you find this online material?

Search within ScholarsArchive.
Surprisingly, this is probably the least desirable method of access. The search engine in the repository is not the most agile or precise. You will be better off:

Searching with your favorite search engine.
Scholars Archive is routinely mined by open access web-crawlers. If you know what you want, just search for it.

Browse the collection to see what is available.

  • Starting at the ScholarsArchive home page.
  • Clickon the “Browse By … Community” link on the left side of the screen. A long list of communities and collections will come up.
  • Click on the Natural Resources collection.
  • Click on the Sub-Community for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Within the ODFW sub-collection are publications from ODFW and the earlier Oregon Fish Commission. Series scanned include the Research Briefs, Research Notes, Contributions and Annual Reports.


Mark Karnowski and others at ODFW have been busily scanning documents in their possession, and have made significant contributions to this resource. We hope to begin a scanning project in the Guin Library in the near future.

Other sources for ODFW publications:

The Corvallis Research Laboratory has many publications on its website, including Progress and Information Reports.

Other publications can be found in the StreamNet Library . You have to look closely at the record sometimes to find the link, but this is a good resource for hard-to-find items. The Oregon State Library catalog has links to many publications. If you are interested in the southern part of our state, the Southern Oregon Digital Archives (SODA) is a wonderful resource. You will probably want to click on the “Bioregion Collection.”

Head to the Valley Library for Graduate Student and Faculty Workshops on using EndNote Web (4/19), Preparing Your IRB Submissions (4/20) and Grad Student Grant Searching (4/20). Find session descriptions, times and locations and register to save your seat today at: http://ica.library.oregonstate.edu/subject-guide/656

Canadian government information can be difficult to find. Here are some tips.

Anyone interested in cold-water species will probably find the WAVES catalog useful.

WAVES http://inter01.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/

The WAVES database is the online catalog of the libraries of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The Canadians have done a lot of work digitizing their publications, and you can find online versions of most Canadian manuscript reports and Canadian technical reports that have been published in the last few years. They've re-designed their web pages, and you can see at a glance if the publication you want is available online. The "advanced" search is particularly useful, because you can specify author, series, date as well as keywords.

This is also a very useful resource for translations. The issues in the series "Canadian translation of fisheries and aquatic sciences" are listed, and, although almost none of them are available online, this is a most valuable resource for finding translations of Russian, Japanese and other publications. The Guin Library has many, but not all, issues in this series. Try variant spellings for author names, especially for the Russians.

The OSU Libraries and the OSU Press have digitized Chapter 9 on tsnuamis
from Bob Yeat's' Living with earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest. It's
available in ScholarsArchive. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/20592

The book by OSU author, Robert Yeats, is written for the non-scientists and explorer the history of tsnumis in out area and their past impacts. Yeats details the differences between nearby and distant earthquakes and the waves they generate. He also suggests who people should respond.

Yeats is one of the world's leading experts on earthquakes, their causes and effects. He was among the first scientists to suggest in the mid-1980s that great earthquakes are possible in the Pacific Northwest on the Cascadia Subduction Zone. It has a geological makeup very similar to that of the subduction zone that just caused a massive earthquake, tsunami and catastrophic damage in Japan.

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