OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Ecampus News

Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

October 20, 5-6:30 p.m. 
Learning Innovation Center (LInC), 2nd floor Forum space

Open Access Week is an annual celebration of open access publishing and the drive to make knowledge freely available. The OSU Libraries and Press is hosting an event on Tuesday, October 20, 5-6:30 p.m. in the Forum space on the second floor of the Learning Innovation Center. If you’re considering an academic or research career, come and hear what you should know about open access. OSU faculty and a graduate student will discuss why they choose to make their research available open access and how open access contributes to their success as researchers. The panel will be followed by a Q and A and hors d'oeuvres.

Panelists:

Kevin Ahern, Senior Instructor in the department of Biochemistry and Biophysics

Dr. Kevin Ahern holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Biophysics from Oregon State University and is currently the Director for Undergraduate Research and a Senior Instructor in the department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Kevin’s immensely popular Biochemistry courses are well known at OSU, and his students clearly benefit from his passion for – and dedication to – the subject. It’s not only OSU students, though, who are benefitting from his passion and dedication. Kevin recorded his lectures, along with his more than 100 biochemistry-related songs set to popular music, and made them openly available to the world through his own YouTube channel. In addition, he co-authored, with Indira Rajagopal, the textbook, “Biochemistry Free and Easy,” which he also made open access.

Wanda Crannell, BioResource Research Interdisciplinary Sciences Program Advisor/Instructor

Wanda Crannell, MS, has over 20 years of experience in culturally-sensitive undergraduate STEM advising and instruction via the BioResource Research Interdisciplinary Program BS degree “the research major” and student events organization working with OSU undergraduate research students, OSU Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) Chapter, OSU Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Sciences (SACNAS) Chapter, as Co-PI for three USDA Multicultural Scholars Program grants, and CAS representative for OSU PNW-NSF LSAMP Board.

Austin Fox, Ph.D. candidate, Materials Science

Austin Fox is a Ph.D. candidate in Materials Science working with the Multi-Functional Thin Films group on processing–structure–property relationships in lead-free thin films deposited by PVD methods. Austin became interested in open access while completing his undergraduate studies at Alfred University in upstate New York, where, being a small institution, most journal articles were not available. This interest led him to seek out opportunities to help promote open access in his own research and to others. Last year he was selected to go to the OpenCon 2014 international conference as a delegate for OSU. Since then, he has given two talks on open access and has been steering his research and career path toward open science.

George Poinar, Courtesy Faculty, Department of Integrative Biology

Dr. George Poinar is currently in the Department of Integrative Biology at OSU. He conducts research on insects, nematodes and fossils in amber, especially fossilized remains of parasites and pathogens. His studies on actual vectors of human diseases in Africa and the South Pacific were conducted while serving as a consultant for the World Health Organization and United Nations. He has published extensively on these topics and has written several books with his wife, Roberta, including “The Amber Forest,” “The Quest for Life in Amber,” and “What Bugged the Dinosaurs?”, based on their experiences collecting and studying amber around the world. George also studies insects living in the Pacific coast dunes.

Mendeley (10/27) and EndNote (10/28) workshops offered

Check out Mendeley on October 27, a web-based, social tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. If you missed it the first time, EndNote (Basic and Intermediate/Advanced) is being offered again on October 28; try it out for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. 

View the remaining offerings in the library’s fall workshop series for grad students and faculty at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Mendeley (10/27) and EndNote (10/28) workshops offered

Check out Mendeley on October 27, a web-based, social tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. If you missed it the first time, EndNote (Basic and Intermediate/Advanced) is being offered again on October 28; try it out for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. 

View the remaining offerings in the library’s fall workshop series for grad students and faculty at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Mendeley (10/27) and EndNote (10/28) workshops offered

Check out Mendeley on October 27, a web-based, social tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. If you missed it the first time, EndNote (Basic and Intermediate/Advanced) is being offered again on October 28; try it out for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. 

View the remaining offerings in the library’s fall workshop series for grad students and faculty at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Mendeley (10/27) and EndNote (10/28) workshops offered

Check out Mendeley on October 27, a web-based, social tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. If you missed it the first time, EndNote (Basic and Intermediate/Advanced) is being offered again on October 28; try it out for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. 

View the remaining offerings in the library’s fall workshop series for grad students and faculty at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Mendeley (10/27) and EndNote (10/28) workshops offered

Check out Mendeley on October 27, a web-based, social tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. If you missed it the first time, EndNote (Basic and Intermediate/Advanced) is being offered again on October 28; try it out for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. 

View the remaining offerings in the library’s fall workshop series for grad students and faculty at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Mendeley (10/27) and EndNote (10/28) workshops offered

Check out Mendeley on October 27, a web-based, social tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. If you missed it the first time, EndNote (Basic and Intermediate/Advanced) is being offered again on October 28; try it out for capturing, managing and citing your research sources. 

View the remaining offerings in the library’s fall workshop series for grad students and faculty at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Hideko Tamura Snider, survivor of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, will be coming to campus to give a lecture coinciding with the Nuclear Age exhibit at the Valley Library. The lecture called “Surviving Hiroshima, Blooming Peace” will be on Thursday, October 22 at 7 p.m. in the LaSells Stewart Center. 

Hideko Tamura Snider is a “hibakusha,” a survivor of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima at the end of World War II. Though she survived with injuries, her mother and many thousands of others did not survive. Since 1979, Hideko has been appearing before professional organizations, university classes and community groups across the United States and in her native Japan, telling her story and encouraging people of all cultures and nations to examine the consequences of the use of nuclear weapons and to work toward peace and nuclear nonproliferation. 

In this talk, she will speak on the physical, psychological and spiritual effects of the bomb, from the immediate aftermath to more permanent consequences, and will discuss the challenge of peace and of lessons that we have learned from Hiroshima since the war. 

After the publication in 1996 of her memoir, One Sunny Day, Tamura Snider founded One Sunny Day Initiatives, which educates the public about the consequences of the use of nuclear weapons and plants seeds of peace, hope and reconciliation among people
of the world through educational presentations and cultural exchange programs.

She is also the author of the children’s book, When a Peace Tree Blooms, and the 2015 Hiroshima Ambassador for Peace. Tamura Snider’s lecture on October 22 is free and open to the public.

The lecture by Tamura Snider is sponsored by the Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU’s Valley Library, the Environmental Arts and Humanities Initiative, the Citizenship and Crisis Initiative, the OSU Holocaust Memorial Program, the School of Language, Culture and Society, and the School of History, Philosophy and Religion.

The exhibit at the Valley Library, “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope,” is on view through March 1, 2016 in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Center Reading Room on the library’s fifth floor.

Hideko Tamura Snider, survivor of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, will be coming to campus to give a lecture coinciding with the Nuclear Age exhibit at the Valley Library. The lecture called “Surviving Hiroshima, Blooming Peace” will be on Thursday, October 22 at 7 p.m. in the LaSells Stewart Center. 

Hideko Tamura Snider is a “hibakusha,” a survivor of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima at the end of World War II. Though she survived with injuries, her mother and many thousands of others did not survive. Since 1979, Hideko has been appearing before professional organizations, university classes and community groups across the United States and in her native Japan, telling her story and encouraging people of all cultures and nations to examine the consequences of the use of nuclear weapons and to work toward peace and nuclear nonproliferation. 

In this talk, she will speak on the physical, psychological and spiritual effects of the bomb, from the immediate aftermath to more permanent consequences, and will discuss the challenge of peace and of lessons that we have learned from Hiroshima since the war. 

After the publication in 1996 of her memoir, One Sunny Day, Tamura Snider founded One Sunny Day Initiatives, which educates the public about the consequences of the use of nuclear weapons and plants seeds of peace, hope and reconciliation among people
of the world through educational presentations and cultural exchange programs.

She is also the author of the children’s book, When a Peace Tree Blooms, and the 2015 Hiroshima Ambassador for Peace. Tamura Snider’s lecture on October 22 is free and open to the public.

The lecture by Tamura Snider is sponsored by the Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU’s Valley Library, the Environmental Arts and Humanities Initiative, the Citizenship and Crisis Initiative, the OSU Holocaust Memorial Program, the School of Language, Culture and Society, and the School of History, Philosophy and Religion.

The exhibit at the Valley Library, “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope,” is on view through March 1, 2016 in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Center Reading Room on the library’s fifth floor.

Hideko Tamura Snider, survivor of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, will be coming to campus to give a lecture coinciding with the Nuclear Age exhibit at the Valley Library. The lecture called “Surviving Hiroshima, Blooming Peace” will be on Thursday, October 22 at 7 p.m. in the LaSells Stewart Center. 

Hideko Tamura Snider is a “hibakusha,” a survivor of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima at the end of World War II. Though she survived with injuries, her mother and many thousands of others did not survive. Since 1979, Hideko has been appearing before professional organizations, university classes and community groups across the United States and in her native Japan, telling her story and encouraging people of all cultures and nations to examine the consequences of the use of nuclear weapons and to work toward peace and nuclear nonproliferation. 

In this talk, she will speak on the physical, psychological and spiritual effects of the bomb, from the immediate aftermath to more permanent consequences, and will discuss the challenge of peace and of lessons that we have learned from Hiroshima since the war. 

After the publication in 1996 of her memoir, One Sunny Day, Tamura Snider founded One Sunny Day Initiatives, which educates the public about the consequences of the use of nuclear weapons and plants seeds of peace, hope and reconciliation among people
of the world through educational presentations and cultural exchange programs.

She is also the author of the children’s book, When a Peace Tree Blooms, and the 2015 Hiroshima Ambassador for Peace. Tamura Snider’s lecture on October 22 is free and open to the public.

The lecture by Tamura Snider is sponsored by the Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU’s Valley Library, the Environmental Arts and Humanities Initiative, the Citizenship and Crisis Initiative, the OSU Holocaust Memorial Program, the School of Language, Culture and Society, and the School of History, Philosophy and Religion.

The exhibit at the Valley Library, “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope,” is on view through March 1, 2016 in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Center Reading Room on the library’s fifth floor.

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