OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

To celebrate the Press’s fiftieth anniversary, they are making a selection of excerpts from twenty recent Press books available online from their website and ScholarsArchive@OSU. This sampler is entitled “Telling Oregon’s Stories: Oregon State University Press at Fifty."

OSU Press and the OSU Libraries Center for Digital Scholarship and Services are also pleased to announce the online availability of 12 additional books that have been out of print for several years. The books include “Redefining the Past : Essays in Diplomatic History in Honor of William Appleman Williams,” “The Marine Plant Biomass of the Pacific Northwest Coast, and “Regionalism and the Pacific Northwest.”

The books are free online as high-resolution, searchable PDF files in the press’s collection in the ScholarsArchive@OSU open access digital repository. These books join Theodore Stern’s two-volume works in the repository, “Chiefs and Chief Traders: Indian Relations at Fort Nez Percés, 1818-1855,” and “Chiefs and Change in the Oregon Country.” “Tsunami!”, a chapter from Robert Yeats’ book “Living with Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest“ was made available open access this year after the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami.

University Libraries helps advance research at the university through its open access repository ScholarsArchive@OSU, the fourth-ranked single university open access repository in the United States. ScholarsArchive@OSU includes all theses and dissertations produced at the university since 2006, an increasing number of older theses and dissertations, faculty articles, conference proceedings and journals.

About the Center for Digital Scholarship and Services: The Center for Digital Scholarship and Services within the OSU Libraries provides services to support the creation, storage and use of digital scholarship and describes and organizes these and other library resources for access.

About the OSU Press: The OSU Press plays a vital role in the cultural and literary life of the Pacific Northwest by providing readers with a better understanding of the region. The press specializes in scholarly and general interest books about the history, culture, literature, environment, and natural resources of the state and region.

To celebrate the Press’s fiftieth anniversary, they are making a selection of excerpts from twenty recent Press books available online from their website and ScholarsArchive@OSU. This sampler is entitled “Telling Oregon’s Stories: Oregon State University Press at Fifty."

OSU Press and the OSU Libraries Center for Digital Scholarship and Services are also pleased to announce the online availability of 12 additional books that have been out of print for several years. The books include “Redefining the Past : Essays in Diplomatic History in Honor of William Appleman Williams,” “The Marine Plant Biomass of the Pacific Northwest Coast, and “Regionalism and the Pacific Northwest.”

The books are free online as high-resolution, searchable PDF files in the press’s collection in the ScholarsArchive@OSU open access digital repository. These books join Theodore Stern’s two-volume works in the repository, “Chiefs and Chief Traders: Indian Relations at Fort Nez Percés, 1818-1855,” and “Chiefs and Change in the Oregon Country.” “Tsunami!”, a chapter from Robert Yeats’ book “Living with Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest“ was made available open access this year after the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami.

University Libraries helps advance research at the university through its open access repository ScholarsArchive@OSU, the fourth-ranked single university open access repository in the United States. ScholarsArchive@OSU includes all theses and dissertations produced at the university since 2006, an increasing number of older theses and dissertations, faculty articles, conference proceedings and journals.

About the Center for Digital Scholarship and Services: The Center for Digital Scholarship and Services within the OSU Libraries provides services to support the creation, storage and use of digital scholarship and describes and organizes these and other library resources for access.

About the OSU Press: The OSU Press plays a vital role in the cultural and literary life of the Pacific Northwest by providing readers with a better understanding of the region. The press specializes in scholarly and general interest books about the history, culture, literature, environment, and natural resources of the state and region.

To celebrate the Press’s fiftieth anniversary, they are making a selection of excerpts from twenty recent Press books available online from their website and ScholarsArchive@OSU. This sampler is entitled “Telling Oregon’s Stories: Oregon State University Press at Fifty."

OSU Press and the OSU Libraries Center for Digital Scholarship and Services are also pleased to announce the online availability of 12 additional books that have been out of print for several years. The books include “Redefining the Past : Essays in Diplomatic History in Honor of William Appleman Williams,” “The Marine Plant Biomass of the Pacific Northwest Coast, and “Regionalism and the Pacific Northwest.”

The books are free online as high-resolution, searchable PDF files in the press’s collection in the ScholarsArchive@OSU open access digital repository. These books join Theodore Stern’s two-volume works in the repository, “Chiefs and Chief Traders: Indian Relations at Fort Nez Percés, 1818-1855,” and “Chiefs and Change in the Oregon Country.” “Tsunami!”, a chapter from Robert Yeats’ book “Living with Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest“ was made available open access this year after the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami.

University Libraries helps advance research at the university through its open access repository ScholarsArchive@OSU, the fourth-ranked single university open access repository in the United States. ScholarsArchive@OSU includes all theses and dissertations produced at the university since 2006, an increasing number of older theses and dissertations, faculty articles, conference proceedings and journals.

About the Center for Digital Scholarship and Services: The Center for Digital Scholarship and Services within the OSU Libraries provides services to support the creation, storage and use of digital scholarship and describes and organizes these and other library resources for access.

About the OSU Press: The OSU Press plays a vital role in the cultural and literary life of the Pacific Northwest by providing readers with a better understanding of the region. The press specializes in scholarly and general interest books about the history, culture, literature, environment, and natural resources of the state and region.

To celebrate the Press’s fiftieth anniversary, they are making a selection of excerpts from twenty recent Press books available online from their website and ScholarsArchive@OSU. This sampler is entitled “Telling Oregon’s Stories: Oregon State University Press at Fifty."

OSU Press and the OSU Libraries Center for Digital Scholarship and Services are also pleased to announce the online availability of 12 additional books that have been out of print for several years. The books include “Redefining the Past : Essays in Diplomatic History in Honor of William Appleman Williams,” “The Marine Plant Biomass of the Pacific Northwest Coast, and “Regionalism and the Pacific Northwest.”

The books are free online as high-resolution, searchable PDF files in the press’s collection in the ScholarsArchive@OSU open access digital repository. These books join Theodore Stern’s two-volume works in the repository, “Chiefs and Chief Traders: Indian Relations at Fort Nez Percés, 1818-1855,” and “Chiefs and Change in the Oregon Country.” “Tsunami!”, a chapter from Robert Yeats’ book “Living with Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest“ was made available open access this year after the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami.

University Libraries helps advance research at the university through its open access repository ScholarsArchive@OSU, the fourth-ranked single university open access repository in the United States. ScholarsArchive@OSU includes all theses and dissertations produced at the university since 2006, an increasing number of older theses and dissertations, faculty articles, conference proceedings and journals.

About the Center for Digital Scholarship and Services: The Center for Digital Scholarship and Services within the OSU Libraries provides services to support the creation, storage and use of digital scholarship and describes and organizes these and other library resources for access.

About the OSU Press: The OSU Press plays a vital role in the cultural and literary life of the Pacific Northwest by providing readers with a better understanding of the region. The press specializes in scholarly and general interest books about the history, culture, literature, environment, and natural resources of the state and region.

To celebrate the Press’s fiftieth anniversary, they are making a selection of excerpts from twenty recent Press books available online from their website and ScholarsArchive@OSU. This sampler is entitled “Telling Oregon’s Stories: Oregon State University Press at Fifty."

OSU Press and the OSU Libraries Center for Digital Scholarship and Services are also pleased to announce the online availability of 12 additional books that have been out of print for several years. The books include “Redefining the Past : Essays in Diplomatic History in Honor of William Appleman Williams,” “The Marine Plant Biomass of the Pacific Northwest Coast, and “Regionalism and the Pacific Northwest.”

The books are free online as high-resolution, searchable PDF files in the press’s collection in the ScholarsArchive@OSU open access digital repository. These books join Theodore Stern’s two-volume works in the repository, “Chiefs and Chief Traders: Indian Relations at Fort Nez Percés, 1818-1855,” and “Chiefs and Change in the Oregon Country.” “Tsunami!”, a chapter from Robert Yeats’ book “Living with Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest“ was made available open access this year after the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami.

University Libraries helps advance research at the university through its open access repository ScholarsArchive@OSU, the fourth-ranked single university open access repository in the United States. ScholarsArchive@OSU includes all theses and dissertations produced at the university since 2006, an increasing number of older theses and dissertations, faculty articles, conference proceedings and journals.

About the Center for Digital Scholarship and Services: The Center for Digital Scholarship and Services within the OSU Libraries provides services to support the creation, storage and use of digital scholarship and describes and organizes these and other library resources for access.

About the OSU Press: The OSU Press plays a vital role in the cultural and literary life of the Pacific Northwest by providing readers with a better understanding of the region. The press specializes in scholarly and general interest books about the history, culture, literature, environment, and natural resources of the state and region.

As part of Open Access Week, Oregon State University Libraries is pleased to be hosting a talk by MacKenzie Smith, Science Fellow at the Creative Commons, on the impact of Open Access and research data.  Her talk, entitled, ³Open Access to Research Data:  the Next Frontier,² will look at the open science movement, the implications of open science and the roles of libraries to curate and provide long-term preservation for scientific content.  This will be a timely talk for both librarians and researchers as funding agencies (most notably the National Science Foundation) are pushing grantees to consider the long-term management of research data.  These changes, coupled with the open science movement, are pushing researchers, libraries and administrators to address the future management of research data on their campuses.

MacKenzie Smith's talk will highlight this event starting at 2:30-4:00.

MacKenzie Smith is a senior academic library leader with particular  expertise in digital libraries and archives, online information and knowledge management, and e-Science data curation and governance. She was the Associate Director for Technology at the MIT Libraries for the past decade, overseeing their technology strategy, research and development program, and technological systems and services. Her research has focused on applications of the Semantic Web to scholarly communication and digital data curation, including long-term data preservation and archiving. She was also the Project Director for MIT¹s collaboration with Hewlett-Packard to build DSpace, the open source digital archive platform now in widespread use, and has led many other research projects that advanced the international digital library agenda. She continues to serve as a Research Director at the MIT Libraries, overseeing current sponsored research projects, and is also a Science Commons Research Fellow at the Creative Commons, working on issues related to research data governance (policy and the technical implementation of policy).

As part of Open Access Week, Oregon State University Libraries is pleased to be hosting a talk by MacKenzie Smith, Science Fellow at the Creative Commons, on the impact of Open Access and research data.  Her talk, entitled, ³Open Access to Research Data:  the Next Frontier,² will look at the open science movement, the implications of open science and the roles of libraries to curate and provide long-term preservation for scientific content.  This will be a timely talk for both librarians and researchers as funding agencies (most notably the National Science Foundation) are pushing grantees to consider the long-term management of research data.  These changes, coupled with the open science movement, are pushing researchers, libraries and administrators to address the future management of research data on their campuses.

MacKenzie Smith's talk will highlight this event starting at 2:30-4:00.

MacKenzie Smith is a senior academic library leader with particular  expertise in digital libraries and archives, online information and knowledge management, and e-Science data curation and governance. She was the Associate Director for Technology at the MIT Libraries for the past decade, overseeing their technology strategy, research and development program, and technological systems and services. Her research has focused on applications of the Semantic Web to scholarly communication and digital data curation, including long-term data preservation and archiving. She was also the Project Director for MIT¹s collaboration with Hewlett-Packard to build DSpace, the open source digital archive platform now in widespread use, and has led many other research projects that advanced the international digital library agenda. She continues to serve as a Research Director at the MIT Libraries, overseeing current sponsored research projects, and is also a Science Commons Research Fellow at the Creative Commons, working on issues related to research data governance (policy and the technical implementation of policy).

As part of Open Access Week, Oregon State University Libraries is pleased to be hosting a talk by MacKenzie Smith, Science Fellow at the Creative Commons, on the impact of Open Access and research data.  Her talk, entitled, ³Open Access to Research Data:  the Next Frontier,² will look at the open science movement, the implications of open science and the roles of libraries to curate and provide long-term preservation for scientific content.  This will be a timely talk for both librarians and researchers as funding agencies (most notably the National Science Foundation) are pushing grantees to consider the long-term management of research data.  These changes, coupled with the open science movement, are pushing researchers, libraries and administrators to address the future management of research data on their campuses.

MacKenzie Smith's talk will highlight this event starting at 2:30-4:00.

MacKenzie Smith is a senior academic library leader with particular  expertise in digital libraries and archives, online information and knowledge management, and e-Science data curation and governance. She was the Associate Director for Technology at the MIT Libraries for the past decade, overseeing their technology strategy, research and development program, and technological systems and services. Her research has focused on applications of the Semantic Web to scholarly communication and digital data curation, including long-term data preservation and archiving. She was also the Project Director for MIT¹s collaboration with Hewlett-Packard to build DSpace, the open source digital archive platform now in widespread use, and has led many other research projects that advanced the international digital library agenda. She continues to serve as a Research Director at the MIT Libraries, overseeing current sponsored research projects, and is also a Science Commons Research Fellow at the Creative Commons, working on issues related to research data governance (policy and the technical implementation of policy).

As part of Open Access Week, Oregon State University Libraries is pleased to be hosting a talk by MacKenzie Smith, Science Fellow at the Creative Commons, on the impact of Open Access and research data.  Her talk, entitled, ³Open Access to Research Data:  the Next Frontier,² will look at the open science movement, the implications of open science and the roles of libraries to curate and provide long-term preservation for scientific content.  This will be a timely talk for both librarians and researchers as funding agencies (most notably the National Science Foundation) are pushing grantees to consider the long-term management of research data.  These changes, coupled with the open science movement, are pushing researchers, libraries and administrators to address the future management of research data on their campuses.

MacKenzie Smith's talk will highlight this event starting at 2:30-4:00.

MacKenzie Smith is a senior academic library leader with particular  expertise in digital libraries and archives, online information and knowledge management, and e-Science data curation and governance. She was the Associate Director for Technology at the MIT Libraries for the past decade, overseeing their technology strategy, research and development program, and technological systems and services. Her research has focused on applications of the Semantic Web to scholarly communication and digital data curation, including long-term data preservation and archiving. She was also the Project Director for MIT¹s collaboration with Hewlett-Packard to build DSpace, the open source digital archive platform now in widespread use, and has led many other research projects that advanced the international digital library agenda. She continues to serve as a Research Director at the MIT Libraries, overseeing current sponsored research projects, and is also a Science Commons Research Fellow at the Creative Commons, working on issues related to research data governance (policy and the technical implementation of policy).

As part of Open Access Week, Oregon State University Libraries is pleased to be hosting a talk by MacKenzie Smith, Science Fellow at the Creative Commons, on the impact of Open Access and research data.  Her talk, entitled, ³Open Access to Research Data:  the Next Frontier,² will look at the open science movement, the implications of open science and the roles of libraries to curate and provide long-term preservation for scientific content.  This will be a timely talk for both librarians and researchers as funding agencies (most notably the National Science Foundation) are pushing grantees to consider the long-term management of research data.  These changes, coupled with the open science movement, are pushing researchers, libraries and administrators to address the future management of research data on their campuses.

MacKenzie Smith's talk will highlight this event starting at 2:30-4:00.

MacKenzie Smith is a senior academic library leader with particular  expertise in digital libraries and archives, online information and knowledge management, and e-Science data curation and governance. She was the Associate Director for Technology at the MIT Libraries for the past decade, overseeing their technology strategy, research and development program, and technological systems and services. Her research has focused on applications of the Semantic Web to scholarly communication and digital data curation, including long-term data preservation and archiving. She was also the Project Director for MIT¹s collaboration with Hewlett-Packard to build DSpace, the open source digital archive platform now in widespread use, and has led many other research projects that advanced the international digital library agenda. She continues to serve as a Research Director at the MIT Libraries, overseeing current sponsored research projects, and is also a Science Commons Research Fellow at the Creative Commons, working on issues related to research data governance (policy and the technical implementation of policy).

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