Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

On Sunday Dec. 3, a small electrical fire at the Valley Library set off the fire alarms and necessitated the evacuation of the building. As one of the busiest public buildings on campus, the safety of our community is our top priority. Many people in the building evacuated in a timely fashion. However, many ignored the fire alarms and did not clear the building. While we all hope that emergencies will not happen, they do, so we'd like to take this opportunity to make our emergency procedures clear, so that you will know what you need to do to keep our community safe.

  • When you hear an emergency alarm in a library building, you must leave immediately. In fact, failure to do so could result in a misdemeanor fine!
  • In a building the size of the Valley Library, we cannot verify that an alarm is not a false alarm before we act, and neither should you. Do not assume that an alarm is a drill. Instead, leave the building quickly and quietly. 
  • OSU Library employees will be available to help direct you as you leave the building. Be aware that they are not trained emergency responders. If you notice another person in distress, exit the building and notify a library staff member. They will notify emergency personnel.
  • Please treat the library staff and students who are trying to clear the building with respect and remember they have a job to do!

GRAD 521: Research Data Management

2 credits. Corvallis. Winter term, CRN 39060.

If you are new to collecting data, the way you care for your data can have profound implications on the success of your research. This course provides you with a solid understanding of how to save, describe, preserve and publish your data. 

Following good data management practices will help your career by making you more efficient and increasing the visibility and impact of your research. By preserving and sharing your data correctly, you will also contribute to accelerating scientific breakthroughs in your field. 

During the course, you will explore topics including data ownership, data organization, data documentation, version control, and data sharing. You will have hands-on sessions introducing you to tools and strategies that will help you make your science more reproducible, like organizing your data in spreadsheets, using R to analyze your data, using Git as a version control software, or depositing data in ScholarsArchive@OSU. 

Taught by Clara Llebot Lorente, Assistant Professor and Data Management Specialist for OSU Libraries. 

View GRAD 521 in the course catalog at http://catalog.oregonstate.edu/CourseDetail.aspx?subjectcode=GRAD&coursenumber=521.

GRAD 521: Research Data Management

2 credits. Corvallis. Winter term, CRN 39060.

If you are new to collecting data, the way you care for your data can have profound implications on the success of your research. This course provides you with a solid understanding of how to save, describe, preserve and publish your data. 

Following good data management practices will help your career by making you more efficient and increasing the visibility and impact of your research. By preserving and sharing your data correctly, you will also contribute to accelerating scientific breakthroughs in your field. 

During the course, you will explore topics including data ownership, data organization, data documentation, version control, and data sharing. You will have hands-on sessions introducing you to tools and strategies that will help you make your science more reproducible, like organizing your data in spreadsheets, using R to analyze your data, using Git as a version control software, or depositing data in ScholarsArchive@OSU. 

Taught by Clara Llebot Lorente, Assistant Professor and Data Management Specialist for OSU Libraries. 

View GRAD 521 in the course catalog at http://catalog.oregonstate.edu/CourseDetail.aspx?subjectcode=GRAD&coursenumber=521.

Natalia Fernández, curator and archivist at Oregon State University Libraries and Press, was named a winner of this year’s I Love My Librarian Award from the American Library Association. She is one of only 10 librarians in the country this year to garner this national honor. She is also the first librarian from Oregon to ever earn the award. 

Fernández received a $5,000 prize at an award ceremony and reception held on November 30 in New York City. The ceremony was hosted by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, which co-sponsors the award along with the New York Public Library and the New York Times. The American Library Association administers the award. 

“With charisma, commitment and social responsibility, she has led projects that have benefited hundreds of families in rural communities,” according to a colleague outside of OSU Libraries who nominated Fernández, adding that, “Faculty across campus speak in glowing terms of Natalia’s breadth of knowledge about archival materials and her expansive imagination in working with faculty to come up with creative and engaging materials and activities to help students understand and explore the complexities of history.”

Fernández is being recognized for her leadership in transforming lives and communities through education and lifelong learning. She engages students from diverse backgrounds who have often felt excluded from library and archival spaces, and she uses outreach strategies to expand the boundaries of the library to reach underserved communities in rural Oregon. Fernández also preserves and shares the histories of the LGBTQ community members in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest, helping to foster socially just archives.

 “I am so honored and grateful to my incredible colleagues and community partners for nominating me for this award,” says Fernández. “It is such a joy to collaborate with OSU’s and Oregon’s LGBTQIA and communities of color to empower them to preserve, share and celebrate their stories.”

The winter break workshop series from OSU Libraries lets you catch up on some skills that you’ve been putting off learning like Qualtrics, Git, EndNote, and Zotero

Registration is encouraged but not required. View all the offerings in the library’s winter break workshop series and register for your sessions (we’ll send you a reminder) at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops.

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

The winter break workshop series from OSU Libraries lets you catch up on some skills that you’ve been putting off learning like Qualtrics, Git, EndNote, and Zotero

Registration is encouraged but not required. View all the offerings in the library’s winter break workshop series and register for your sessions (we’ll send you a reminder) at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops.

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

 

The Institute for Natural Resources and Oregon State University Libraries and Press, in partnership with a number of Oregon state agencies and universities, recently launched several new topical webpages and tools as part of the Oregon Explorer Natural Resources Digital Library.

The new Oregon Hazards Reporter allows users to view flood, tsunami, earthquake, volcano and landslide hazard data from multiple state and federal agencies. Users can delineate an area for any location in Oregon and generate a preliminary hazard report. The preliminary hazard reports include a hazard description, data description and limitations of use. This tool was developed for use by local planners in partnership with the Oregon Department of Land Conservation. 

Throughout Oregon, there are a growing number of local collaborative groups engaged with forest restoration to help minimize wildfire risk, support local economies and improve forest management. The University of Oregon Ecosystem Workforce Program has been actively developing and updating this statewide forest restoration dataset. The Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon Solutions reached out to the Oregon Explorer program to make this data publicly accessible through a map viewer and a new Forest Collaborative landing page. 

Eastern Oregon is home to over 15 million acres of sage-grouse habitat. Once abundant, the range and numbers of sage-grouse have declined. The Sage-Grouse Conservation Partnership advances policies and actions that reduce threats to sage-grouse, sagebrush ecosystems and Oregon's rural communities. The Oregon Explorer was selected as the place to make information about sage-grouse and the SageCon partnership available. The new Oregon Explorer Sage-Grouse landing page, Sage-Grouse Data Viewer, Sage-Grouse Development Registry and several articles were developed to inform planning activities in Oregon’s sage-grouse habitats. Funding and support was provided by the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Oregon Department of Administrative Services and the Portland State University National Policy Consensus Center.

 

The Institute for Natural Resources and Oregon State University Libraries and Press, in partnership with a number of Oregon state agencies and universities, recently launched several new topical webpages and tools as part of the Oregon Explorer Natural Resources Digital Library.

The new Oregon Hazards Reporter allows users to view flood, tsunami, earthquake, volcano and landslide hazard data from multiple state and federal agencies. Users can delineate an area for any location in Oregon and generate a preliminary hazard report. The preliminary hazard reports include a hazard description, data description and limitations of use. This tool was developed for use by local planners in partnership with the Oregon Department of Land Conservation. 

Throughout Oregon, there are a growing number of local collaborative groups engaged with forest restoration to help minimize wildfire risk, support local economies and improve forest management. The University of Oregon Ecosystem Workforce Program has been actively developing and updating this statewide forest restoration dataset. The Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon Solutions reached out to the Oregon Explorer program to make this data publicly accessible through a map viewer and a new Forest Collaborative landing page. 

Eastern Oregon is home to over 15 million acres of sage-grouse habitat. Once abundant, the range and numbers of sage-grouse have declined. The Sage-Grouse Conservation Partnership advances policies and actions that reduce threats to sage-grouse, sagebrush ecosystems and Oregon's rural communities. The Oregon Explorer was selected as the place to make information about sage-grouse and the SageCon partnership available. The new Oregon Explorer Sage-Grouse landing page, Sage-Grouse Data Viewer, Sage-Grouse Development Registry and several articles were developed to inform planning activities in Oregon’s sage-grouse habitats. Funding and support was provided by the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Oregon Department of Administrative Services and the Portland State University National Policy Consensus Center.

“The Messenger” magazine, which OSU Libraries and Press publishes twice a year, has a new issue available. The magazine highlights the accomplishments and ongoing efforts of the Libraries and Press, and here are some of the stories that you’ll find inside:

— “Think It Would Be Cool to Have Access to Books Printed Before 1700? Donor Funding Provides Access to Early English Books Online”

— “Some Families have Long Ties to the University (like, five generations long)”

— “Book Series from OSU Press Captivates Kids and Inspires Interest in the Natural World”

— “Ever Wonder How Many People Use the Valley Library in a Week?”

— “Interview with a Mover and Shaker”

“The Messenger” is available at multiple locations inside the Valley Library, including in the information rack inside the main entrance, and online at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/the-messenger-recent-issue. See what's new and newsworthy at your library.

“The Messenger” magazine, which OSU Libraries and Press publishes twice a year, has a new issue available. The magazine highlights the accomplishments and ongoing efforts of the Libraries and Press, and here are some of the stories that you’ll find inside:

— “Think It Would Be Cool to Have Access to Books Printed Before 1700? Donor Funding Provides Access to Early English Books Online”

— “Some Families have Long Ties to the University (like, five generations long)”

— “Book Series from OSU Press Captivates Kids and Inspires Interest in the Natural World”

— “Ever Wonder How Many People Use the Valley Library in a Week?”

— “Interview with a Mover and Shaker”

“The Messenger” is available at multiple locations inside the Valley Library, including in the information rack inside the main entrance, and online at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/the-messenger-recent-issue. See what's new and newsworthy at your library.

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